Posts Tagged ‘engineered’

Differences Between Engineered and Solid Hardwood Floors

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

Flooring is never a one size fits all, and can be hard to make a decision on what kind is best in your home. That being said – if you’re looking for flooring that is not only beautiful, but also durable and long-lasting, hardwood floors are always the best choice. But with so many different types of wood floor types, species and stains, it may seem like a difficult decision picking the right one for your home.

There are two main types of wood floors – solid and engineered. Solid wood planks are made from one piece of wood, while engineered wood has a core of plywood and a layer of hardwood veneer on the surface. Both options will look beautiful in any home, but there are key differences that can help you figure out which type to choose for your home. 

The installation process

Engineered wood doesn’t react to changing temperatures, and is less likely to buckle in the heat and humidity. Because of this, it is usually installed above or below ground level. Solid wood will eventually expand over time, so it is best to only be installed on ground level or above. 

Durability of the floors

Both engineered and solid wood floors are durable, but solid wood is usually more stable since it has to be glued and nailed to a subfloor. On the other hand, in extreme temperatures, engineered wood has more stability because it’s less likely to buckle or expand. Regardless, solid wood is still a better choice if you are looking for stability and durability, since engineered wood’s surface can be thin.

The cost of the floors

Engineered hardwood floors are usually less expensive than solid hardwood floors, but is still largely dependent on the quality and species of the wood. There is no definitive cost of the two, but engineered is usually between $3 to $14 per square foot, while solid is between $8 to $15 per square foot. 


Resistance to moisture 

Engineered wood is the better choice if you’re looking for moisture resistance. Made with a plywood base, engineered wood is less likely to warp or flex because of moisture. Solid wood should not be placed where moisture comes in the home the most. This includes areas in the home such as bathrooms or basements. 


Now that you’ve figured out which type of wood to use in your home, it’s time to figure out the species and stain! Our team here at Signature Hardwood Floors is here to help. Contact us for any questions, and a FREE ESTIMATE. You can call us at 410.415.0755 or click here today! You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn!

Engineered Wood Floor Planks As An Accent Wall

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017

Are you looking to modernize your space? Engineered wood flooring on walls is the perfect way to give any room a unique touch. This could create a slight hipster look, or bring in a more traditional feel with the right materials.

WoodonWalls2

(more…)

All About Wood Floor Cupping

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

Wood floor cupping is when the sides of hardwood floors are higher up than the center of the boards. This produces a concave-like look on the floor. The issue comes from moisture content changes.

water-cupped-wood-floors

 

(more…)

How Much Does a Hardwood Floor Really Cost?

Monday, July 11th, 2016

The price of a hardwood floor installation in your home will vary depending on different factors, including the type of wood you would like to install. It is usually less expensive than other flooring options such as tile, but can be more expensive than laminate or carpet. Here are some different elements that can help you choose a hardwood floor that is perfect for your home and budget.

Untitled design (more…)

When To Use Engineered Floors

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Engineered floors are a great alternative to solid hardwood floors. Since there are advantages and disadvantages to both types of wood, the choice can come down solely to your preference. There are, however, situations where using engineered floors are favorable. Here are the instances in which engineered floors may be the best fit for your home.

 IMG_7733

(more…)

The Different Types of Hardwood Flooring

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Hardwood flooring comes in numerous shapes, sizes, colors, and finishes. Because of this, it is often hard to choose the right type of hardwood floors for your home. Where do you start? Is one type of flooring better than another?

Well, we are here to help. We will break down the three main types of hardwood floors to help you decide which makes the most sense for you and your home.

First of all, don’t confuse wood variety with flooring type; that is a whole other conversation. For this blog entry, we are just concerned with flooring type: solid, engineered, or Acrylic-impregnated wood flooring.

Solid Wood Flooring

This category of hardwood flooring can be broken down into three sub-categories; each is available in an unfinished and a per-finished version. Unfinished flooring must be sanded and finished after installation, while pre-finished flooring is sanded and finished at the factory.

The three sub-categories of solid wood flooring are:

  1. Strip Flooring: Denoted by the thickness and width of its wood planks, solid strip flooring is the most popular hardwood flooring option available today. Strip flooring ranges in thickness from 5/16 of an inch to 3/4 of an inch wide, with widths of 1.5 inches, 2 inches, or 2.25 inches.
  2. Plank Flooring: While this type of flooring only comes in two thicknesses – ½ inch or  ¾  inch – the widths can vary from 3-8 inches.
  3. Parquet Flooring: Made from geometrical patterns, parquet flooring breaks from the traditional look of hardwood floors.

Engineered Wood Flooring

This flooring is produced by adhering layers of plastic laminate veneer with real wood. But do not confuse engineered wood flooring with laminate flooring; the latter does not contain any actual wood.

Acrylic-impregnated Wood Flooring

This type of flooring is infused with sealant and color throughout the thickness of the wood. This means that the “finish” is actually consistent throughout the wood.

Contact the flooring experts at Signature Hardwood Floors, Inc. to help you determine which type of hardwood flooring is best for you. Contact us by calling 410.415.0755 or click here today!

Our mission statement is simple: stay small, personal, and in control of our work, all to ensure that you receive the best job possible! We have a passion for this industry.

You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn as well!

Sources:

What are the different types of hardwood flooring? HardwoodFlooringBlog.com

Ultimate Guide to Hardwood Flooring TLC.HowStuffWorks.com