Posts Tagged ‘wood floor’

What Type of Flooring is Best For Your Kitchen?

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

More than all the other flooring surfaces in your home, your kitchen takes all the heat. From spilled juice to muddy paw prints, your kitchen needs to withstand it all. You may ask yourself: Does hardwood flooring belong in the kitchen? The answer is yes. Many homeowners opt for hardwood floor in the kitchen to create one big room by tying together all the areas in their home. It also makes it easier to wipe up spills, and is easy to maintain.Arts and Crafts Style Kitchen --- Image by © Royalty-Free/Corbis

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Six Things to Do After Your Hardwood Floor is Installed

Friday, February 6th, 2015

 

After plenty of research, planning, design, and pricing, your new hardwood floors have finally been installed. Congratulations! We’re sure you’ll enjoy your new floors. But this isn’t the end of the road. There’s still work left to be done to ensure you’re getting the most out of your new floors. In this week’s blog, learn what you should be doing after the installation of your hardwood floors to make sure they’re protected, as well as what to expect from your floors in the years to come.

Six Things to Do After Your Hardwood Floor is Installed

Wait for the Finish to Dry!

In the immediate short term, you’ll have to wait for the finish to dry. How long this process will take depends on a number of factors, but most important is the type of finish used. Your contractor can tell you how long you can expect to have to wait for the finish to dry, and how to test if it’s dry. Don’t try to walk on the floor before it’s ready! Make sure the finish is completely dry and cured before you start walking on your new floor.

Keep the Temperature and Humidity Steady

Wood floors like temperatures and humidity levels that stay within the following ranges:

Temperature: 60-80 degrees Fahrenheit

Humidity: 30-50 percent

While it’s fairly easy to keep the temperature consistent, keeping a consistent humidity level is a little more difficult. Depending on the season, you may want to use a humidifier (winter) or dehumidifier (summer) to adjust the humidity levels. In the summer, your home’s central A/C acts as an effective dehumifier.

Don’t Worry About Small Cracks

Cracks between boards are totally normal and are the result of changes in humidity. This is because wood likes to have the same humidity level as the air around it. In the winter, moisture will leave the wood because the air is dryer. This causes the wood to contract, which makes those cracks between the boards show up. As long as the crack is less than the width of a dime, you have nothing to worry about. If the crack is larger than that, or if the wood is starting to show other signs of problems, contact your wood floor contractor.

Watch for Changing Colors

All species of wood will experience a color change over time due to exposure to light and natural aging. Some species will experience more significant changes than others. Some will become lighter while others will become darker. This is not a defect in the wood but rather a natural process.

Put Down Rugs and Mats

Rugs and mats are a great way to protect your wood floor from furniture and wear in high-traffic areas. Natural rubber, untreated natural fibers, jute, and urethane mats/rugs play well with wood. Watch out for sticky backings, or backings with plasticizers, which you don’t want.

Keep it Clean!

The best way to clean your wood floor is with a dry dust mop. Wet mopping your floor is not good for the finish or the wood. You can use a lightly dampened mop on occasion to clean the floor.

wood-floor

To learn more about anything and everything related to engineered hardwood flooring, contact the flooring experts at Signature Hardwood Floors, Inc. by calling 410.415.0755 or click here today! You can also follow us on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn!

 

Wood Floors and Radiant Heat: Can They Work Together?

Thursday, January 8th, 2015

 

Can you install a wood floor over radiant heat? Or, if you already have a wood floor, can you install radiant heat underneath it? Learn everything you need to know about radiant heat and wood floors in this week’s blog!

Radiant Heat and Wood Floors

Installing Wood Flooring Over Radiant Heat

If you have radiant heat, you can install some, but not all, wood flooring over top. Not all wood flooring is going to work well in this situation. Solid wood floors, for example, perform the worst over radiant heat. Manufacturers may state in their warranties whether or not their product is suited for use over radiant heat. Here are a few things you need to know about installing wood flooring over radiant heat.

  1. Engineered hardwood is better than solid. Engineered hardwood can stand up better to the fluctuations in temperature than solid hardwood.
  2. The narrower the plank, the better. If you had your eye on a wide plank, it would be a good idea to reconsider. Narrower planks (2-3 inches) are less susceptible to cupping.
  3. Quartersawn planks are better than flatsawn.
  4. The moisture content of the wood shouldn’t exceed six percent.

There are also a few tips for using radiant heat over a wood floor.

  1. Keep the surface temperature of the floor below 85 degrees.
  2. Try to keep the temperature and humidity levels inside your home as stable as possible.

 

Installing Radiant Heat Below Wood Floors

Do you already have wood floors but want radiant heat? If your wood floor meets the requirements listed above, then it is possible to retrofit with radiant heat. If your floor joists are accesible from underneath, you can loop the tubing in the joist bays. The ideal tubing for radiant heat is PEX (cross-linked poylethelene). This is a plastic material that is extremely resistant to the effects of repeated heating and cooling. Rubber tubing should be avoided. Also, make sure to use a mixing valve in your radiant heat system. This regulates the temperature of the water flowing through the tubes to keep it consistent, which is easier on your wood floor.

radiant heat wood floor

 

To learn more about anything and everything related to hardwood flooring, contact the flooring experts at Signature Hardwood Floors, Inc. by calling 410.415.0755 or click here today! You can also follow us on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn!

 Sources

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/asktoh/question/0,,357313,00.html

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/asktoh/question/0,,192899,00.html

 

Five Reasons to Replace Your Carpet with Wood Flooring

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

 

If you have a carpeted floor that’s looking like it’s seen better days, you’re may be thinking about replacing it. If you are, have you considered installing a new wood floor instead of carpet? There are lots of good reasons to replace your wood floor with carpet. In fact, you might already have a wood floor under the carpet that can be restored! If you’re thinking about replacing your carpet, consider these great reasons to install a new wood floor.

wood floor

Five Reasons to Replace Your Carpet with Wood Flooring

Wood floors last longer.

Carpet has a lifespan of around 7 years. Wood floors on the other hand can easily last for more than 50 years, and with the right care can exceed this marker by a lot. In 50 years, you would have had to replace your carpet 7 times! Wood floors save you a lot of trouble and a lot of money by lasting longer than carpet.

Upkeep is easier.

Keeping a wood floor clean is as easy as a weekly dusting with a dry mop. Carpet is a lot more difficult. Small particles of debris get trapped in the fibers of the carpet. It takes a lot of effort to get them out, which is why a deep steam clean is usually recommended for cleaning carpet. Steam cleaning isn’t cheap, and you’ll probably want to do it several times a year if you’re set on keeping your carpets really clean. Wood floors save you a lot of time in the cleaning department.

Wood floors are better for those with allergies.

On a similar note, the fibrous nature of carpet makes it worse for those with allergies or other respiratory sensitivities than wood floors. This is because when you walk on a carpet, some of the debris trapped in the fibers is released into the air, where it can agitate to your respiratory system. On a wood floor, dust and debris sit right on top, where they are easily cleaned off and discarded. If you have allergies, wood floors are definitely the way to go.

Buyers like wood floors.

When it comes time to sell your home, you’ll be very glad you have wood floors. Buyers generally prefer wood floors, and they can help add value and appeal to your home when you put it on the market.

You might already have wood floors.

If you have carpet, there’s a chance that it was installed over wood floors. With the right wood floor contractor, you can even restore these wood floors to their former beauty. To learn more about restoring wood floors or installing new wood flooring, contact the flooring experts at Signature Hardwood Floors, Inc. by calling 410.415.0755 or click here today! You can also follow us on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn!

 

Removing Coffee Stains from Hardwood Floors

Friday, March 7th, 2014

Spilled your morning cup of coffee on your hardwood floor? Try the following to remove the coffee stain from your wood floor.

 

  1. Dilute ¼ cup of apple cider vinegar in a gallon of water. Normally you don’t want vinegar on your wood floor, but the acetic acid is good at removing stains, which you need to do in this situation.
  2. Use a cloth or sponge to dab and cover the whole stain with the vinegar and water mixture. Don’t pour the mixture on the stain, because you don’t want any excess water on your floor.
  3. Let the acetic acid in the vinegar break down the stain for an hour or two.
  4. Using a soft cloth or sponge, scrub the stain. If it doesn’t break up, repeat the previous steps. Never use an abrasive cleaning pad on a hardwood floor, which will scratch it. If these steps still don’t work, wet a sponge with a cola soda and dab the stain again. The phosphoric acid in colas can remove stains.
  5. Rinse the treated area with a damp sponge, and then dry it by hand with a towel immediately.

 

coffee stain wood floor

 

Signature Hardwood Floors has been servicing the entire Maryland, Northern Virginia, and South Central Pennsylvania areas since July of 2004. With more than twenty years of experience, we offer top quality products and exceptional craftsmanship. We are licensed and insured for both residential and commercial projects.

In addition, we are a recognized member of the National Wood Flooring Association, noted for our staff’s regular participation in continuing education programs on wood flooring. Our skilled and knowledgeable staff is proficient in new installation, refinishing, repairs, stain applications, oil and water base poly, and restorations. This expertise enables us to provide you, the customer, with the best results at an affordable price.

Contact the flooring experts at Signature Hardwood Floors, Inc. to help you determine which type of hardwood flooring is best for you. Contact us by calling 410.415.0755 or click here today!

Our mission statement is simple: stay small, personal, and in control of our work, all to ensure that you receive the best job possible! We have a passion for this industry.

You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn as well!

 

Source

http://www.ehow.com/how_8767945_remove-coffee-stains-hardwood-flooring.html

A Method for Cleaning Your Wood Floors

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

This method for cleaning your wood floors is straightforward and will give them a thorough cleaning. The best way to protect your wood floors is to clean them on a regular basis. Use the following steps the next time you clean your hardwood floors.

 

Baseboards

First, clean the baseboards using a soft microfiber dusting pad, with a fringe if possible. Run it along the boards without lifting it. Lifting the pad allows larger debris to get under it, and this debris can scratch the floor as you move along. Let the fringe of the pad collect the larger debris while the pad handles the dust. After you’ve finished the baseboards, continue dusting with the pad across the whole floor, again taking care not to lift it. Then use the hose on your vacuum to get any remaining debris near the baseboards.

Mop

Use a spray bottle to mist the floor with water or a cleaner that is designed for wood floors. If it’s not made for wood floors, it could damage the floor, so take care to use a cleaner that says it is safe on wood floors. Water works fine too. Once you’ve misted the floor use a second microfiber pad (for wet use only) to mop. Continue spraying and mopping in sections until you’re finished. You don’t need much water or cleaning solution, the floor should be drying behind you as you go.

 

clean wood floor

 

Signature Hardwood Floors has been servicing the entire Maryland, Northern Virginia, and South Central Pennsylvania areas since July of 2004. With more than twenty years of experience, we offer top quality products and exceptional craftsmanship. We are licensed and insured for both residential and commercial projects.

In addition, we are a recognized member of the National Wood Flooring Association, noted for our staff’s regular participation in continuing education programs on wood flooring. Our skilled and knowledgeable staff is proficient in new installation, refinishing, repairs, stain applications, oil and water base poly, and restorations. This expertise enables us to provide you, the customer, with the best results at an affordable price.

Contact the flooring experts at Signature Hardwood Floors, Inc. to help you determine which type of hardwood flooring is best for you. Contact us by calling 410.415.0755 or click here today!

Our mission statement is simple: stay small, personal, and in control of our work, all to ensure that you receive the best job possible! We have a passion for this industry.

You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn as well!

Source

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/reader-tip-the-best-way-to-cle-60991

Can You Use Water and Vinegar to Clean a Wood Floor?

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Water and vinegar is a common household cleaning solution which is used for applications in almost every room of the house. The acidic vinegar easily breaks down organic compounds and the water helps to temper the acidity of the vinegar to ensure it doesn’t break down anything else.

 

When it comes to wood floors, however, the use of water and vinegar is not recommended. This is because you’re not actually cleaning the wood, you’re cleaning the chemical finish on top of the floor. Vinegar will break down the finish on the wood floor and leave it looking dull. It will also reduce the ability of the finish to protect the floor, and cause your wood floor to age more rapidly. So while water and vinegar is great for plenty of household cleaning tasks, don’t use it on your wood floors. Use products that are designed for wood floors and spray in a fine mist so as to not overwhelm the floor with moisture.

 

water and vinegar wood floor

 

Signature Hardwood Floors has been servicing the entire Maryland, Northern Virginia, and South Central Pennsylvania areas since July of 2004. With more than twenty years of experience, we offer top quality products and exceptional craftsmanship. We are licensed and insured for both residential and commercial projects.

In addition, we are a recognized member of the National Wood Flooring Association, noted for our staff’s regular participation in continuing education programs on wood flooring. Our skilled and knowledgeable staff is proficient in new installation, refinishing, repairs, stain applications, oil and water base poly, and restorations. This expertise enables us to provide you, the customer, with the best results at an affordable price.

Contact the flooring experts at Signature Hardwood Floors, Inc. to help you determine which type of hardwood flooring is best for you. Contact us by calling 410.415.0755 or click here today!

Our mission statement is simple: stay small, personal, and in control of our work, all to ensure that you receive the best job possible! We have a passion for this industry.

You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn as well!

 

Source

https://www.mybonahome.com/floors101/about-hardwood/why-water-and-wood-don-t-mix.html

How to Remove a Red Wine Stain from a Wood Floor

Friday, January 3rd, 2014

Red red wine. Stay close to me. Don’t fall on my hardwood floor. Oops. We all make mistakes, but the mistake of spilling a glass of red wine leaves a very visible mark on a wood floor, which can stain if not treated quickly. The sooner you can remove the stain, the better. Here are some tips for removing a red wine stain from a wood floor.

 

  1. Blot up the wine using a wet paper towel, taking care not to rub it into the wood.
  2. Pour undiluted bleach on the stain and let it sit for 45 minutes. Though this may take off the surface coat of finish, it may remove the stain. Wear gloves when working with bleach.
  3. If bleach doesn’t work, try oil soap. Mix it with hot water according to the directions on the package, and then use a soft cloth to scrub the mixture into the wood.
  4. Should neither of these methods work, a soda paste made from baking soda, and either mineral, lemon, or linseed oil may work. Form a paste and then use a soft cloth to rub it into the stain in the direction of the grain. Leave it for 30 minutes, and then remove it with a dry, clean cloth.

 

You may have heard that you can use rottenstone or pumice stone to remove a red wine stain from a wood floor. Though this may work, both of these substances are very abrasive and should only be used as a last resort, if at all. They have the potential to do significant damage to your wood floor. If the steps listed above don’t work, the best bet is to contact a wood floor professional before resorting to an abrasive.

 

red wine stain floor

 

Signature Hardwood Floors has been servicing the entire Maryland, Northern Virginia, and South Central Pennsylvania areas since July of 2004. With more than twenty years of experience, we offer top quality products and exceptional craftsmanship. We are licensed and insured for both residential and commercial projects.

In addition, we are a recognized member of the National Wood Flooring Association, noted for our staff’s regular participation in continuing education programs on wood flooring. Our skilled and knowledgeable staff is proficient in new installation, refinishing, repairs, stain applications, oil and water base poly, and restorations. This expertise enables us to provide you, the customer, with the best results at an affordable price.

Contact the flooring experts at Signature Hardwood Floors, Inc. to help you determine which type of hardwood flooring is best for you. Contact us by calling 410.415.0755 or click here today!

Our mission statement is simple: stay small, personal, and in control of our work, all to ensure that you receive the best job possible! We have a passion for this industry.

You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn as well!

 

Source

http://www.wikihow.com/Remove-a-Red-Wine-Stain-from-a-Hardwood-Floor-or-Table

What’s the Best Floor for the Kitchen?

Friday, November 1st, 2013

There are lots of options to choose from when it comes to flooring for the kitchen. Tile? Linoleum? Vinyl? All viable options, but we think hardwood is the best choice for the kitchen floor, and here’s why.

 

Visual Appeal

Tile, linoleum, and vinyl can all look nice, but none of them have the same visual characteristics as wood. Wood floors give a kitchen a nice, rustic look that can’t be matched by other flooring options.

Functionality

Wood floors can hold up well under the heavy traffic to which the kitchen is inevitably subjected. A polyurethane finish protects them from moisture which ends up on the floor.

Safety

Other types of flooring can get very slippery when they get a little wet. Wood is less slippery, and thus safer for everyone who walks in the kitchen and doesn’t see that water spill on the floor. Wood is also much more comfortable on bare feet than cold tile or linoleum.

 

hardwood kitchen floor

 

Signature Hardwood Floors has been servicing the entire Maryland, Northern Virginia, and South Central Pennsylvania areas since July of 2004. With more than twenty years of experience, we offer top quality products and exceptional craftsmanship. We are licensed and insured for both residential and commercial projects.

In addition, we are a recognized member of the National Wood Flooring Association, noted for our staff’s regular participation in continuing education programs on wood flooring. Our skilled and knowledgeable staff is proficient in new installation, refinishing, repairs, stain applications, oil and water base poly, and restorations. This expertise enables us to provide you, the customer, with the best results at an affordable price.

Contact the flooring experts at Signature Hardwood Floors, Inc. to help you determine which type of hardwood flooring is best for you. Contact us by calling 410.415.0755 or click here today!

Our mission statement is simple: stay small, personal, and in control of our work, all to ensure that you receive the best job possible! We have a passion for this industry.

You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn as well!

Sources

http://www.hgtv.com/kitchens/choose-the-best-flooring-for-your-kitchen/index.html

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/article/0,,229547,00.html

How Finish Affects Hardwood Floor Care

Friday, September 20th, 2013

There are several different styles of finishes for hardwood floors, each of which with their own unique characteristics. Consequently, when you clean your wood floor you have to take into consideration what kind of finish it has. The type of wood on the other hand is inconsequential. In order to tell what kind of finish you have, rub your finger on the floor. If it doesn’t smudge, this means the floor is surface sealed. If it does smudge, this means the floor was waxed after having been treated with a seal, oil, shellac, varnish, or lacquer which penetrated the floor.

 

Surface-sealed wood floors are sealed with urethane, polyurethane, or polyacrylic. Most new wood floors are sealed this way. These floors have the advantage of being stain and water-damage resistant. They are also the easiest to clean. All you need to do is sweep, mop, and you’re good to go.

 

Penetrating-seal-treated and oil-treated wood floors use a seal or oil finish that soaks into the wood grain and hardens to protect the wood. This type of floor is more difficult to clean as it must be protected with liquid or paste wax. Shellacked, varnished, and lacquered floors share these characteristics. In order to clean these floors, just sweep and vacuum, don’t use water. Once or twice a year you can strip the old wax and apply a fresh coat to give the floor a new sheen.

 

 

Signature Hardwood Floors has been servicing the entire Maryland, Northern Virginia, and South Central Pennsylvania areas since July of 2004. With more than twenty years of experience, we offer top quality products and exceptional craftsmanship. We are licensed and insured for both residential and commercial projects.

In addition, we are a recognized member of the National Wood Flooring Association, noted for our staff’s regular participation in continuing education programs on wood flooring. Our skilled and knowledgeable staff is proficient in new installation, refinishing, repairs, stain applications, oil and water base poly, and restorations. This expertise enables us to provide you, the customer, with the best results at an affordable price.

Contact the flooring experts at Signature Hardwood Floors, Inc. to help you determine which type of hardwood flooring is best for you. Contact us by calling 410.415.0755 or click here today!

Our mission statement is simple: stay small, personal, and in control of our work, all to ensure that you receive the best job possible! We have a passion for this industry.

You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn as well!

Source

http://www.ivillage.com/hardwood-floors-101/7-a-219366